Former Nurse Speaks Out Against HPV Vaccine


This Episode's Guest
Former nurse Debora

Devi Jennings

Former Nurse

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccines such as Gardasil and Cervarix to prevent cervical cancer and other related diseases.

Children as young as 9 years old may get the vaccine. The most current formula of the vaccine requires a series of two doses.

The HPV vaccine is very safe, and research shows the benefit outweighs the risk of complications, according to the CDC.

But, some controversy remains. There are parents and health care workers who are not convinced of the government’s safety figures.

Some parents have even contacted Drugwatch to share their stories about rare, crippling side effects after receiving Gardasil.

Because of a law that took effect in the 1980s, people injured by certain vaccines cannot sue drug companies. Instead, they must apply for compensation through a government program called the National Vaccination Injury Compensation Program (VICP).

On this episode of the Drugwatch Podcast, our guest is former nurse Deborah “Devi” Jennings.

Jennings is a member of Rhode Islanders Against Mandated HPV Vaccinations.

She feels the law protecting vaccine makers gives them no incentive to make safe, effective vaccines.

“There’s no liability to the pharmaceutical firms that are making the vaccine or the doctors, nurses [and] health care people that are administering it,” Jennings told Drugwatch. “Without liability, one has to question what is going to keep the pristine standard in place.”

Jennings began her vaccine research with the flu vaccine. Then she began looking into the HPV vaccine in 2015.

Her research led her to uncover various HPV vaccine side effects such as autoimmune problems, memory loss, paralysis and seizures, among others.

On the show, she discusses various studies and facts about the HPV virus, the HPV vaccine and vaccine mandates.

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Transcript -
Michelle Llamas

Welcome to another episode of the Drugwatch podcast. I'm your host, Michelle Llamas. With us today to talk about the HPV vaccine is Deborah Jennings, but a lot of folks in the community know her as Devi, and she's a member of the Rhode Islanders Against Mandated HPV Vaccinations. And she's also a nurse. So she has had a lot of experience with these vaccines and health in general, and she's here to let us know more about it. Welcome to the show, Debbie.

Devi Jennings

Well, thank you very much. I'm happy to be here.

Michelle Llamas

First of all, tell us about your background and how you came to be involved with the HPV vaccine.

Devi Jennings

I practiced nursing for a number of years, geriatric, and then medical/surgical, ENT nursing at Strong Memorial Hospital in Brooklyn, back to Rochester, New York. At the point, I was out on a medical disability. That was 2009. That's when I started becoming really interested in vaccination. It coincided with the H1N1.

Michelle Llamas

Your first interest in that was because of the flu virus and the flu vaccine.

Devi Jennings

Yeah. There was a big light that went off and then I started doing research, and of course, something really happened with the H1N1. At that point, it was an intensive research. I got involved with the GMO-free movement and the labeling. I got…just grassroots activism, geoengineering. Then when I moved to Rhode Island in 2015, I became aware of the HPV mandate. That's when I started really researching the HPV vaccine.

Michelle Llamas

Explain what this vaccine mandate is and why it's important.

Devi Jennings

It's specific to mandate. We're seeing that ... I believe it's West Virginia has mandate for all elementary school children. California has a new mandate for that. There's medical exemptions in place in California, but they're hard to get. They like to rein in the doctors. Somehow the doctors just feel a lot of pressure.

In Rhode Island, the HPV vaccine was mandated, but there is a religious exemption in place, and by our definition in Rhode Island, that also encompassed philosophical and personal ideology. Your belief system. That's the saving grace. But I would imagine the majority of the citizens here are unaware of that, because they're being directed that the child can't get to school. This is middle school, seventh and eighth, won't be admitted unless they're compliant with that HPV vaccine, and there's other vaccines in play.

Michelle Llamas

What's important for people to know then is that with this mandate, the government is basically saying that in order for the kids to go to school, they've got to have these vaccinations. That's kind of what we want to let people know. HPV is now included in this mandate.

Devi Jennings

The HPV's a mandate. The others are recommended. They're not mandated. I think there's a greater transparency with these other vaccinations. I think most parents trust the system and I think they do believe vaccines are safe and effective and it's the best way to go for them.

Michelle Llamas

Now we're talking about Cervical Health Awareness Month, and one of the issues with the HPV vaccine and why it came about was it's supposed to protect people from the human papilloma virus, which is what HPV stands for. Can you tell us a little bit about what that virus is and why some people recommend getting the HPV vaccine?

Devi Jennings

There's literature saying there's even as many as 150 types of these viruses, the HPV virus. I really don't know how they discern them. There's a huge correlation between cancers of the mouth, the throat, penile cancer, vaginal cancer, cervical cancer, the big one, that can cause genital warts, and there's 15 high-risk type that are kind of correlating to the cervical cancer.

Michelle Llamas

The theory is anyway, let's get these HPV vaccines so we prevent people from getting these kinds of cancers and diseases, right? That's how they talk about the HPV vaccine.

Devi Jennings

But there's no data showing that these vaccines will prevent cervical cancer. That to me is a selling point, because you'd have to run these vaccines out for 20, 30 years. Cervical cancer usually takes a long time to take place, and in the interim, if you're going ... like my generation went to the gynecologist ... at least I did and most of the gals I knew went and had regular pap-smear checkups. So there was plenty of time to intervene if they saw precancerous lesions.

Michelle Llamas

You think that some of the numbers and all of that might be overblown to just sort of get people to get the vaccine?

Devi Jennings

Absolutely. And I think a lot of people might think they're protected and will not follow up with regular gynecological checkups.

Michelle Llamas

I see. That's important point you said there. Just because you get the vaccine doesn't mean you can stop going to get the checkups and checking yourself out.

Devi Jennings

The vaccine's only been shown effective five years - tops. To be introducing this at nine years old, it should be the decision of the parent. If the child's not sexually active at 12, I can't speak to this generation, but I think the parents should be the one deciding.

Michelle Llamas

You've done a little bit of research on these vaccines. What are some of the issues and complications that you've seen in literature?

Devi Jennings

Well, it's huge. And the more and more I research, it's more and more disturbing to me. The adverse effects of this vaccine put together with the 13 other vaccines we have is over the top. And this particular vaccine is presenting with more and more and more complications, and we're looking at seizures, premature ovarian failure and sterility, blindness, autoimmune conditions. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis is one of them. That's gone up 1,000 percent since the introduction of the HPV vaccine. Spontaneous abortions gone up 270 percent. There's stroke, there is cardiac problem, there is orthostatic hypotension, there's paralysis, speech problem, short-term memory loss, debilitating pain, sensory disorder, pancreatitis, and it goes on.

Michelle Llamas

I mean, this is in young people, so this is affecting teenagers, right?

Devi Jennings

Destroying the lives ... many of the gals are huge athletes, overachievers almost, multifaceted, gifted, radiant, charismatic, and they're just taken down in their prime. And there are some that we're finding ways of detoxing, and every family goes through and finds functional medicine docs or naturopathic docs, homeopathic docs, and are finding ways, but it's expensive and there's very little support for these victims. 1986's law was put into place and it pretty much establishes some ... this new precedent in '86 establishes where there's no liability to the pharmaceutical firms that are making the vaccine or the doctors, nurses, health care people that are administering it. Without liability, one has to question what is going to keep the pristine standard in place?

Michelle Llamas

With that, there's no incentive, right, for the drugmakers or anybody to be really on the up and up about these vaccines.

Devi Jennings

Absolutely. And I think we're all pretty aware of what's happened. Money and control. So all the little guys are being consolidated and swallowed up by the big guys. So even in the pharmaceutical industry, say Merck, biggest in the world, but definitely they encompass all the other arms of vaccinations. Tremendous amount of clout.

Michelle Llamas

The drug companies do have the most power here, which doesn't really help the issue, and we're talking ... you mentioned Merck. They are, of course, the manufacturer of the HPV vaccine here in the states and the world.

Devi Jennings

Yeah, that's Gardasil, GlaxoSmithKline, with the Cervarix. That was introduced a few years later. I think it was 2009 the Cervarix was approved by the FDA. In 2006, the Gardasil was approved. And then more recently, the Gardasil 9 has come into existence. That was in 2014.

Michelle Llamas

Talk a little bit about how the HPV vaccines work and there's a process to the vaccine, because it's not just one. From what I know, you have to come back three times, right?

Devi Jennings

That's the original HPV vaccine, but what they were finding, there were strange anomalies with that. First of all, if a woman has a strain in her body, they're not doing testing to see if she has the active strain in her body. They're just giving her the vaccine and that will potentiate and bring out that cancer. Big red flag. So if it potentiates the existing HPV strain, that's a big question.

So they created the Gardasil 9, which covers more of the high-risk strains to address that problem. It's new, relatively new. And I believe in Rhode Island, that's what's being administered now. It's a two-part, but they're also finding if you start the series with the three-part, that it's not as effective. The antibody count goes down. That's again another question mark.

Michelle Llamas

The whole thing for it to be effective, right, is that they need to go through the actual treatment, all of it. One or two like you're saying, or the three-part.

Devi Jennings

Right, if that's still in practice. Yeah, that's what they recommend. It hasn't shown that it's effective for more than five years. Then what we do? Repeat this all over again and repeat it all over again, and meanwhile you're introducing so many adjuncts and just toxins, and there's hundreds of peer-reviewed articles, so it's not just the proposals of a few doctors that challenge this, and yet, there just is no response from our government and our departments of health, our regulatory agencies. It's really frightening to me.

Michelle Llamas

Any parents that are listening to this now and they've got kids in that age group that are in the recommended HPV vaccine group, what can you tell these parents?

Devi Jennings

I would suggest you do research. We're in the age where a Google search, whatever you're using as your search engine, will open you up to the greatest library that's ever been presented at your fingertip. It's all there. There are Facebook groups, there's Twitter groups. And all you have to do is join a couple of those and you're going to start to understand the complications, not just of the HPV vaccine, but vaccination in general. I firmly, firmly believe that any treatment, medicine, vaccine, if it can result in injury or death, there has to be an informed consent. To never be mandated.

Michelle Llamas

It's all about choice and informed consent, like you mentioned. People are not really made aware of all these risks when they go for the vaccine. I think that's a big deal.

Devi Jennings

And it's not just the HPV. It's also I find there's a lot of similarities between the hepatitis C. Now that's the one I believe I was injured by back in 1992, '93, as a practicing nurse, because my health started becoming very challenged then. I've dealt with chronic pain, debilitating at times, since then. Then with the HPV is they're finding the aluminum a year later in their injection sites. They do a muscle biopsy. They're finding it in that muscle and we're also finding it in ... they did 13 different independent tests, different trials from different countries of the HPV, and it's contaminated with the HPV recombinant DNA, and this is what Dr. Sin Hang Lee, who's a huge researcher and has really been pushing back. He's a former Yale professor. He was called in and he's done brain biopsies on children that have died of the HPV, and he's actually found that HPV and the aluminum, two of the particular strains wrapped around the aluminum in the brain, the organs, and the blood.

Michelle Llamas

Oh, wow! So yeah. No, he found evidence that that can contaminate

Devi Jennings

There's a huge correlation that came from the HPV vaccine. Now you can say, well we don't know if that killed them. Well, I don't need to know any more than that. People are calling them to task. It's just that the government officials are the ones that have to call the regulatory agencies and task. We have independent researchers doing this, and not just with the CDC, but the Health and Human Services, HHS, the National Institutes of Health, the World Health Organization, CTA. They're all interconnected and there's been red flags in every single one of them. We as a people need to just stand up and say enough is enough.

Michelle Llamas

Now the big thing that we mentioned, what can people do with all this? Number one, you said, hey, be an informed consumer. Take a look, do your research before, and this probably applies to any kind of drug, device, vaccine, anything, right? Before you go and you do this treatment, make sure you know about it, and also people shouldn't be afraid to get second opinions.

Devi Jennings

We've got whole organizations that have spoken out against the Gardasil. One's a former Merck employee who just feels it may become the biggest scandal of all time, this particular vaccine. Dr. Diane Harper, who was a lead researcher for both the Cervarix and Gardasil, is speaking out to use extreme caution. Most of these countries that were signed on as part of their national vaccine policy for the HPV, well over half of them have dropped out.

But what we're trying to in Rhode Island, because we can't seem to change the legislative body to roll back the department of health in any way, is just to get the word out, and we're trying to get a greater transparency so when communications are going out from the school to the families, that there is one sentence that there's an opt out. There is a religious exemption in place. It's a simple form to fill out.

Michelle Llamas

Okay. In different states, though, it's going to come down to whatever the law is in that state regarding any mandates, right?

Devi Jennings

Absolutely.

Michelle Llamas

On the HPV vaccine issue, what are your final words for anybody that's listening?

Devi Jennings

Most of these HPV clear themselves. Ninety-five percent clear themselves. We can live with them. We clear it. I don't think you can just do the quantum leap that this is going to prevent cervical cancer. You just can't do it. There's no evidence. Read the insert. Have the discussion with the doctor. If there's pushback from the doctor, you got to find a new pediatrician.

Michelle Llamas

I know that personally I've seen a lot of stories and I've had people call me, parents that have called and say if they only knew a lot of this information, they would never have done it. For any parents listening, just make sure that you make an informed decision. Thanks so much again for being on the show.

Devi Jennings

Thank you, Michelle.

Michelle Llamas

Great information. And if anybody wants to learn more about what they're doing in Rhode Island, you can look at no hpv mandate rhode island, all one word there, dot com, and that's the website for the Rhode Islanders Against Mandated HP vaccination. So everybody take a look and thanks again, Debbie.

Devi Jennings

Thank you for all that you do.

Michelle Llamas

Medicine is definitely something that helps people, but like you mentioned, there's also the downside where there's all these side effects that people don't often know about, and all the money that goes into it. I think if people go into it with clear vision, then they should be okay. It's all about educating, right?

Devi Jennings

That's it. It's all about educating.

Please seek the advice of a medical professional before making health care decisions.

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Michelle Llamas, Senior Content Writer
Written By Michelle Llamas Senior Writer

Michelle Llamas has been writing articles and producing podcasts about drugs, medical devices and the FDA for seven years. She specializes in fluoroquinolone antibiotics, vaccines and products that affect women’s health such as Essure birth control, transvaginal mesh and talcum powder. Michelle collaborates with experts, including board-certified doctors, patients and advocates, to provide trusted health information to the public. Some of her qualifications include:

  • American Medical Writers Association (AMWA) Engage Committee and Membership Committee member
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Health Literacy certificates
  • Original works published or cited in The Lancet, British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology and the Journal for Palliative Medicine
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