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Viagra Lawsuits

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Past users of the erectile dysfunction medication Viagra sued drug maker Pfizer for a variety of claims. Now Pfizer is under fire for the pill’s link to melanoma, a fatal skin cancer.

Viagra and Melanoma

Since its release in 1998, the erectile dysfunction (ED) drug, Viagra brought in billions of dollars for drug giant Pfizer. The blockbuster drug was the first medication available to treat ED, and millions of men took the drug and paid the steep $25-a-pill price tag. The drug is so popular, Pfizer now allows bashful men to purchase it online with a prescription.

But Pfizer soon had to deal with lawsuits stemming from side effects caused by the drug. Men who suffered heart attacks, strokes, vision problems and hearing troubles filed lawsuits against the drug maker. In 2005, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration ordered that warnings about vision loss be added to the drug's label.

Now, Pfizer may soon have to face a new barrage of lawsuits. A 2014 study found that Viagra (sildenafil) nearly doubles men's risk of the deadly skin cancer melanoma. The drug's label fails to warn about this potential side effect.

Why Should You File a Melanoma Lawsuit?

The cost of treating melanoma cancer can take a substantial financial and emotional toll. Sometimes the only way to recover the costs may be to file a legal claim. Lawsuits seek to recover monetary damages for this distress and hardship. They also seek to send a message to the next drug maker who might want to assume the risk of putting a dangerous drug on the market.

Financial and Emotional Damages

Treatments for melanoma include skin biopsies, surgery, chemotherapy, radiation treatments and follow-up doctor's visits. For example, a one-year supply of FDA-approved medicine for melanoma chemotherapy costs $30,000. And the stress of dealing with an illness affects a patient and the entire family.

Send a Message

Drug companies have a duty to provide safe products and to warn the public of health risks and side effects. Sometimes this doesn’t happen, and through no fault of their own, consumers end up facing terrible health problems. Some of these problems can last for the rest of their lives or cause death. Filing a lawsuit holds companies accountable.

Status of Viagra Lawsuits

A number of attorneys are accepting claims from men who took Viagra and developed melanoma. These claims are still in the initial stages, though once the public is aware of the risk more men may come forward.

If you or a loved one took the drug and suffered from melanoma skin cancer, protect your rights and safe guard your ability to file a lawsuit for any compensation you may be entitled to. Depending on the state, you only have limited amount of time to file a claim.

History of Lawsuits

Viagra has a rocky history when it comes to lawsuits, and Pfizer is no stranger to defending its drug in court. Men who once took the drug developed a number of serious side effects for which they took the drug maker to court. Claims that were litigated included those that involved heart events, loss of vision and loss of hearing. Former Viagra users collected millions from Pfizer through those court cases.

Cardiac Concerns

Among the first issues to emerge were potential cardiac complications. Viagra causes sudden drops in blood pressure among some who take it, a problem that can lead to heart attacks and strokes – problems that were the heart of the first legal claims.

Vision Loss

Men who experienced sudden vision loss after taking the medication also filed lawsuits. Viagra can cause Non-Arteritic Ischemic Optic Neuropathy (NAION), in which blood flow to the optic nerve is blocked and causes vision changes that range from decreased vision to blindness.

Hearing Loss

Sudden hearing loss also led to Pfizer going to court as a Viagra-related defendant. The FDA found several instances of hearing loss that was either partial or complete. The FDA had Pfizer revise labels to reflect this additional risk of the drug.